customer experienceTime to turn our attention to the biggest challenge in marketing:  focus on the customer and the customer experience.

In our last Future of Marketing interview, Dr. Liz Alexander discussed thought leadership. Previous topics included Big Data, creating a content culture, the roles of content and technologythe future of search, the science of marketing, the rise of Content Brands and we asked whether the customer or the content is king in the future of marketing.

Today’s  interview is with Daniel Newman (@DanielNewmanUV), Daniel serves as the Co-Founder and CEO of EC3. He is also the author of the best selling business book The Millennial CEO. 

Tell us about yourself?

Daniel Newman on Customer ExperienceI’m on a never ending path to challenge the status quo.  I always want people to meet me and feel like they’re just a little bit better for having crossed my path.  Currently I’m the CEO and Co-Founder of EC3 a Cloud based communications company that is disrupting the way businesses communicate.  The reason I’m here is because I believed that what we did could make businesses run better.  Who wouldn’t want to be a part of something like that?

Tell me about a tough marketing challenge your team faces

Our organization is 100% B2B, so we have to constantly figure out how to help companies that need to move toward our solutions figure out how.  Businesses rarely stop on a dime, but with the proliferation of tech they can hardly afford to stand still.  We have to open their eyes to a better way of doing things while only mildly disrupting what pays their bills today.

How are you approaching that challenge?

Time is enemy number 1 when you are a start-up.  With limited resources you have to spend it on things that make the largest impact.  So I combat the challenge by giving support and resources to those that “Get it.”  I think a lot of businesses spend too much time trying to convince people that don’t want to be convinced.  That is out the window for me…

What we do provides tremendous value to businesses.  If you don’t see it, I’m certain there are others that will.

What’s Your Prediction For The Future of Marketing?

Perhaps I have to believe this…But I think fast and small businesses will unseat a lot of complacent large companies.  They are going to do this by delivering unequaled customer experience which is what the consumer seeks today.  Social interactions will allow the entrepreneur to connect to the consumer like never before.  It is hard for the big enterprise to make that connection and sometimes I’m not sure that the executives of these big companies want to.

Let me know what you think in the comments below. And please follow along on TwitterLinkedInFacebook and Google+ or Subscribe to the B2B Marketing Insider Blog for regular updates.

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About Michael Brenner

Michael Brenner is the Head of Strategy for the leading content marketing platform, NewsCred. He is also the author of B2B Marketing Insider, a contributor to Forbes and a frequent speaker at industry events covering topics such as marketing strategy, social business, content marketing, digital marketing, social media and personal branding.  Follow Michael on Twitter (@BrennerMichael)LinkedInFacebook and Google+ and Subscribe to B2B Marketing Insider by Email

14 Comments

  1. Dr. Rae said…

    Absolutely is my answer to your title lead-in question Michael.

    I’ve noticed that current social media networks are causing “big business” to listen to the
    “customer experience.”

  2. Nahida Meah said…

    I have to agree with Daniel, small businesses have the advantage of being more intimate with customers. Whereas larger businesses can often miss the engagement value of platforms like social media, instead focusing on getting more followers through wide recognition of their brand. The marketing company I work for (Xcite Digital) have a range of big clients who are focusing on not only high influence but also high engagement! Engagement may be arguably more important between the two.

    • Michael Brenner said…

      Nahida, I think you are correct. Engagement ultimately represents a much more quantifiable metric that also represents a deeper level of commitment by the person engaging. We look at reach, engagement and conversion metrics in our attempt to drive affinity with new audiences, to engage them in deeper conversation and then to convert them to either customers or advocates.

  3. Stan Faryna said…

    Daniel is one cool dude. I read his blog. Thanks to Michael for introducing him here on the b2bmarketinginsider.

    Nahida’s comment leads us to consider an interesting question: what has greater impact, presence and coverage or engagement and influence? Engagement and influence, obviously.

    Business partners (complementing businesses) and customers are rarely brought into the storyline and asked to participate emotionally and creatively. Rarely are their feelings and commitment truly solicited. But that’s just what a lean and mean start up has to do. Because it’s a serious competitive advantage – not to mention low cost.

    Here’s an example of how I am helping a start up to bring potential business partners and customers into the story.

    The Corsair: Whovian Fan Fiction, American-Gangnam style
    http://stanfaryna.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/the-corsair-whovian-fan-fiction/

  4. Shep Hyken said…

    Customer service and experience IS the new marketing. The customer gets to decide if you’re keeping your promise to them (or not). That’s done through a brand promise, which is all about marketing, and follow through, which all about customer service and experience. You may want the customer to think of you a certain way, but they will only think that way if they understand what you promise and feel that you have delivered.

  5. Pallavi said…

    Loved the interview. Particularly liked his line that ‘a lot of businesses spend too much time trying to convince people that don’t want to be convinced.’ It is so so true!

  6. Shan said…

    I like the article and strongly believe that organisations need to be more customer centric if they want to be competitive in todays market. In our consulting experience across industries we’ve seen organisation struggling in this area.

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